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How Nike Stole Germany from Adidas 

Nike just pulled off the heist of the century!

You know how Adidas and the German national football team have been tight for like, forever? Well, get ready to have your mind blown because Nike just pulled off the ultimate heist – they snatched Germany right out of Adidas’ arms!

Keep reading to know how exactly this went down.

Nike to replace Adidas as German National team’s main sponsor

The Deal

The contract to supply German kits will be passed from Adidas to US firm Nike in 2027.

Let’s dive into the juicy details of this massive deal. According to reports from Optus Sport, a publication out of Austria, Nike is coughing up a whopping 100 million euros to become the official sponsor of the German national team. That’s a staggering amount, double the 50 million euros that Adidas was paying.

We’re talking serious cash here, folks. 100 million euros is enough to buy a private island and still have plenty left over for a fleet of yachts. Ka-ching!

But the German Football Association (DFB) insists this isn’t just a money grab. They claim the extra money will be pumped back into football development at all levels across Germany.

From the little kickers playing in youth leagues to the big dogs representing the national team, everyone’s supposed to benefit. The DFB wants to keep football thriving and popular in the country.

In their own words, “The DFB has a unique selling point: It is a sports association that finances its member associations and the amateur base and is not financed by them. It puts the money into football. So that football remains a popular sport.

Sounds like a noble cause, right? But let’s be real, a kit sponsorship deal of 100 million euros is still a mind-boggling amount of money.

The DFB also claims they ran a “transparent and non-discriminatory tender process” before selecting Nike. The Swoosh simply made “by far the best financial offer” on the table.

So, while they might be spinning it as a move for the greater good of German football, it’s hard to ignore the fact that Nike’s deep pockets played a major role in snagging this deal.

Adidas and Germany History

But wait, there’s more to this split than just cold, hard cash. Adidas and the German national team have a bond that spans decades – we’re talking 77 years. That’s longer than most of our grandparents have been alive.

Their history is woven into some of the most iconic moments in football. Remember the Adidas Samba shoes that players used to rock on icy pitches back in the day? Those classics were originally designed for the German team way back in 1949.

Speaking of iconic footwear, let’s talk about the Adilette slides. Legend has it that the German team went straight to Adidas founder Adi Dassler himself and asked him to create a shoe that would prevent athlete’s foot in the showers.

Boom! The legendary Adilette slide was born. To this day, it’s a staple in locker rooms around the world.

But the bond between Adidas and the German team goes beyond just footwear. Feast your eyes on the Copa Mundial, arguably the most iconic football boot of all time.

Those bad boys were the kicks of choice for the West German team when they played in the 1982 World Cup final (even though they ended up losing to Italy).

And let’s not forget about Franz Beckenbauer, the man widely regarded as the best German footballer ever. He had his own Adidas sneaker and tracksuit line named after him, cementing his status as an Adidas legend.

Not only the boots, but the jerseys that Adidas made for Germany over the years have been a thing of beauty.

Especially from the 80s and the 90s. Those White tops with an element of the German flag and the iconic three stripes. Damn! they were ahead of their time in terms of design.

The history between Adidas and the German national team runs deep. From iconic footwear to legendary players, their bond is woven into the fabric of football history.

The Reaction

Unsurprisingly, this breakup has sent shockwaves rippling through German society. Politicians are losing their minds over the idea of the national team sporting the Nike Swoosh instead of Adidas’ iconic Three Stripes.

Economy minister Robert Habeck summed up the collective feeling perfectly: “I can hardly imagine the German jersey without the Three Stripes. For me, Adidas and black-red-gold always belonged together. A piece of German identity.”

Those are some heavy words. For many Germans, the Three Stripes are as much a part of their national identity as the black-red-gold flag itself.

Over at Adidas HQ, the mood is understandably somber. CEO Bjorn Gulden, a former footballer himself, took to social media on the day the news broke with a cryptic “mixed day” post.

No need to read between the lines there – that’s a clear sign of the conflicting emotions he’s feeling over losing such a long-standing partnership.

But Gulden is trying to keep it classy, he posted on Instagram while wearing a German football top, writing: “Good luck today Germany! Regardless of what happens in 2027… we are 100% behind the team! We are fans and you are family!”

Class act, that Bjorn Gulden. Even in the face of adversity, he’s showing unwavering support for the team he’s sponsored for decades.

On the flip side, Nike is straight-up gloating about their big coup. CEO John Donahoe called the deal a “great reminder” of Nike’s prowess, boasting, “When Nike brings out our best, no one can beat us.”

Subtle, John. Real subtle. It’s almost like he’s rubbing salt in Adidas’ wounds with comments like that.

The contrasting reactions from the two sportswear giants perfectly capture the mixed emotions surrounding this historic split. While Adidas is licking its wounds, Nike is basking in the glory of their latest conquest.

FAQ

What are the two main sports brands that come from Germany?

Adidas and Puma are the two main brands that come from Germany. A small town called Herzogenaurach is known worldwide because two major sports brands, Adidas and Puma, were started there by feuding brothers who split their business in 1948.

How has Adidas responded to losing the German soccer team to Nike?

Adidas CEO Bjorn Gulden wrote a heartfelt message to the German team: “Good luck today Germany! Regardless of what happens in 2027… we are 100% behind the team! We are fans and you are family!”

When did the German football team start wearing Adidas?

German national teams have worn Adidas gear since the 1950s, with the partnership becoming synonymous with the success on the pitch.

Conclusion

Look, I get it. Change is hard, especially when it comes to something as deeply rooted as the Adidas-Germany partnership. But that’s the name of the game in the world of sports sponsorships.

At the end of the day, the German team has to do what’s best for the future of football in their country. And if that means raking in some serious cash from Nike, then so be it.

Will it be weird seeing the German squad rocking the Swoosh instead of the Three Stripes? Absolutely. But who knows, maybe Nike will whip up some fire kits that’ll have us all saying, “Adidas who?”

Only time will tell, but one thing’s for sure: this is a saga that’ll go down in football history books. So buckle up, folks, because the drama is just getting started!

What do you think?

Written by Mith Panchal

Welcome to my corner of the internet, where my love for football meets the art of storytelling. I'm Mith Panchal,I make memes and write blogs here at tacklefrombehind. Most importantly I’m a crazy football addict just like you guys.

My journey in Football started in 2012 because I liked how Cristiano Ronaldo played in FIFA so out of curiosity I watched a few games of Real Madrid and Cristiano and since that day I've been a proud Madridista.

I think that every football game, every football team, and every player has a story to tell. I like to explore those stories and share the best of them with you guys through these blogs.

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